Messier 48

Messier 48

Messier 48 (M48) is an open star cluster located in Hydra, the largest constellation in the sky. DescriptionVisible From Pacific NorthwestOctober to MarchBest Time To ObserveJanuary and FebruaryMinimum Size Of Viewing DeviceBinocularsObject TypeOpen ClusterDesignationsMessier 48,…


Jupiter

Observation Of Jupiter

Jupiter is one of the brightest objects visible to the naked eye in the night sky, and has been known to ancient civilizations since before recorded history. Jupiter is usually the fourth brightest object in the…


Messier 47

Messier 47

Messier 47 is an open cluster in the constellation Puppis. It was discovered by Giovanni Batista Hodierna before 1654 and independently discovered by Charles Messier on February 19, 1771. It was later independently discovered again,…


Jupiter

Jupiter: A Brief Overview

Being 2.5 times the size of all of the other planets in the Solar System combined, Jupiter is the largest planet in the Solar System. Jupiter has a mass 1/1000th of the Sun and is…


2017 Solar Eclipse Solar Eclipse Planning 2024 eclipse state parks

2024 Eclipse State Parks Statistics

In preparation for the 2024 Total Solar Eclipse that is going to cross the US, we decided to put together a list of State Parks for viewing the eclipse for US states that have 90%…


Messier 46

Messier 46

M46 is a rich open cluster, easily visible with binoculars, that’s located in the Milky Way star fields of the constellation of Puppis. The cluster is a relatively large object with an apparent diameter almost…


Mars

Mars: Scientific Missions

There have been a total of 57 missions launched to Mars before the 2020 Launches. Of those missions, 20 have been successful and 8 are still operational. Lets take a look at some of the…



Messier 45 Pleiades

Messier 45 Pleiades

Commonly called the Pleiades or Seven Sisters, M45 is known as an open star cluster that contains over a thousand stars that are loosely bound by gravity, but it is visually dominated by a handful…


Mars

Moons of Mars

In August 1877, the American astronomer Asaph Hall discovered the two moons of Mars using a 660 mm, 26 in, telescope at the U.S. Naval Observatory.[1] The names of the two satellites, Phobos and Deimos, were chosen by Hall based upon a suggestion by Henry Madan, a…